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To Our Valued Patients,

With the evolving situation of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic and under the guidelines of the Health Officer of the Alameda and Contra-Costa Counties, we will begin the process of re-opening our offices on Monday May 4th in order to provide needed eye and vision care. Moreover, cataract and all other non-cosmetic surgical procedures will soon resume.

Please keep in mind that in order to maintain social distancing protocols and to limit further transmission of the virus, we will be working with a reduced staff and seeing a fewer number of patients as compared to our “normal” schedule. Priority will be given to the most urgent medical cases. We will be implementing a number of measures (including altered check-in/check-out procedures, limiting the number of patients in the office and waiting room, face covering for all persons, temperature screening, etc) that will change your experience in the office. In addition, we will be ramping up our already strict disinfection policies and we will continue to monitor and abide by all local, state and, federal guidelines. Please bear with us through this new reality as these changes are designed to protect you and our staff.

We hope to see you soon and appreciate your trust in us to continue to meet your eye care needs. Stay safe and stay healthy!

The Turner Eye Institute Team

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HELP KERATOCONUS

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA & SAN FRANCISCO BAY AREA SPECIALISTS

HELP KERATOCONUS

NORTHERN CALIFORNIA & SAN FRANCISCO
BAY AREA SPECIALISTS

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About Consultations & Keratoconus

Routine eye exams ensure that a local eye doctor can check the health of your eyes for signs of ocular disease and ensure your vision stays sharp and clear. However, patients with keratoconus often face fluctuations in their prescription and end up passing through various phases. Therefore, a consultation at Turner Eye in San Landro, CA can identify the patient’s level of keratoconus and recommended steps for treatment.

Early Keratoconus

Patients with an early stage of keratoconus may start off wearing eyeglasses or soft contact lenses to correct their vision. As symptoms of light sensitivity and visual distortion start to occur, they are soon directed to wearing hard gas permeable contact lenses to control their vision.

Mild to Moderate Keratoconus

Keratoconus is a progressive disease that, when left unmanaged, can continue to change overtime demanding further intervention. Dr. Patel of Help Keratoconus utilizes intacs to safely reduce the constant changes in the cornea. Intacs helps stabilize the condition by attempting to restore the shape of the cornea to normal. Although intacs are not a permanent solution for some patients, the surgery is safe and effective for patients with early to moderate cases of keratoconus.

Moderate to Severe Keratoconus

In the event a patient reaches a moderate or severe case of keratoconus, where symptoms are causing their vision to blur, feel dizzy, or simply have an inability to perform day to day tasks, corneal cross-linking can be performed to surgically stabilize the cornea and help restore its shape. Not only has corneal cross-linking successfully helped numerous keratoconus patients achieve normal vision, but often keratoconus stops progressing due to the creation of strong bonds.

Of course, one of the most important decisions, when a surgery is recommended, depends on the rate of keratoconus progression and diagnosis by an expert surgeon like Dr. Turner or Dr. Patel. A consultation will ensure your vision is well taken care of so that you can return to living your life with healthy eyesight.

Contemporary Keratoconus Treatment – Corneal Collagen Cross-linking

Corneal collagen cross-linking (CXL) was FDA-approved in 2016, and it rapidly changed the state of professional keratoconus management. In fact, it is probably the most significant development in treating keratoconus since the introduction of specialty contact lenses and corneal transplants. Corneal collagen cross-linking has become the gold standard of eye care for progressive keratoconus.

If you have keratoconus, our San Leandro, CA, will perform a thorough eye exam to determine your candidacy for CXL.

What is corneal collagen cross-linking?

Keratoconus is a condition characterized by an abnormally thin, weak cornea that bulges to become cone-shaped, instead of lying flat like a healthy cornea does. As a result of this irregular shape, vision becomes distorted or blurred. In general, keratoconus is a progressive disorder, but corneal collagen cross-linking can slow it down – helping to prevent additional warpage of the cornea.

CXL aims to strengthen the cornea by adding special bonds in between the natural collagen fibers that you have in your eye. These fibers work to support and stabilize the cornea, therefore strengthening them decreases the degree of corneal protrusion. As a side benefit, CXL may also improve vision. The potential of this painless procedure is tremendous, with minimal risk.

How does corneal collagen cross-linking work?

To begin, your eye doctor will apply eye drops of a specialized riboflavin (B-vitamin) solution on your cornea for about 30 minutes. Then, your eyes will be exposed to UVA light for about 10-30 minutes. To envision what this light looks like, it is similar to the sterilizing blue lights that your local deli counter uses to ensure the surface is hygienic.

When the ultraviolet light interacts with the riboflavin solution, a chemical reaction occurs that causes the collagen fibers to cross-link, or to bond more tightly. That’s the whole procedure. Usually, it takes about one week to notice the initial results and one month to experience the full effects.

Who is a candidate for CXL?

Anyone who has keratoconus or a different corneal disorder may be a suitable candidate for this promising procedure. Before our San Leandro, CA, recommends corneal collagen cross-linking, you will require a detailed, comprehensive eye exam.

What are other treatments for keratoconus?

CXL offers an effective way to slow the progression of keratoconus, but other types of treatment are generally necessary to provide crisp vision with this corneal disorder. A typical first line of treatment is to prescribe eyeglasses. Once glasses are no longer helpful, our eye doctor can fit you with rigid gas permeable specialty contact lenses that gently flatten your bulging cornea, such as scleral lenses. These contacts can enhance vision significantly.

In order to fit you with customized contacts for keratoconus, we will use corneal mapping during your eye exam. The measurements from corneal topography facilitate crafting specialty contact lenses that are a perfect fit.

PTK is another procedure that can be helpful for managing keratoconus and upgrading your wearing comfort of specialty contact lenses. Sometimes, the overstretched collagen fibers of advanced keratoconus can cause scarring, and the back corneal tissues may tear and scar as a result. PTK can smooth out this scar, making it easier to wear contacts.

The last resort treatment for keratoconus is a corneal transplant, and CXL can be a way to avoid this serious procedure. Following a corneal transplant, it is usual for patients to need to wear specialty contact lenses to see clearly.

Eye exams enable early keratoconus treatment with CXL

Early diagnosis of keratoconus is essential for maximizing the benefits of CXL, which can stabilize the cornea and prevent keratoconus from developing further. For the best visual outcomes, corneal collagen cross linking should be performed before other consequences of keratoconus appear.

In addition, a small percentage of patients who undergo CXL will still experience a progression of keratoconus, which is why regular eye exams are critical postoperatively too.

At Help Keratoconus, we put your family’s needs first. Talk to us about how we can help you maintain healthy vision. Call us today: (800) 339-2733 or book an appointment online to see one of our San Leandro eye doctors.

Want to Learn More? Read on!

About Consultations & Keratoconus

World Keratoconus Day — November 10th, 2018

Intacs correct your nearsightedness…and keratoconus!

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Intacs correct your nearsightedness…and keratoconus!

Ever wanted an easy way to get clear vision & reduce your keratoconus symptoms?

With nearly 20 years behind their design & development, Intacs are currently one of the leading corneal implants to correct nearsightedness and FDA approved to treat keratoconus patients.

That’s basically solving your need for glasses or contacts if your vision is just slightly myopic or nearsighted. Even if you have worse vision, the main benefit is to slow down the progression of your keratoconus.

Although the corneal crosslinking (CXL) procedure has become the newest form of treatment, intacs effectively eliminates irregularities caused by keratoconus in about 10 minutes.

We’ve included a little video highlighting intacs, too.

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Can losing a contact lens be traumatic?

Can losing a contact lens be traumatic?

For keratoconus patients, losing a scleral lens can be.

Lost scleral lens keratoconusImagine scanning the floors for a contact lens worth hundreds of dollars? In rare cases, even thousands! That little piece of plastic means a whole lot more than the average contact lens wear.

Scleral lenses are one of the most advanced custom contact lenses available, allowing keratoconus patients to see clearly with unbelievable comfort. However, when that contact lens falls or gets lost, scrambling on the floor blindly feeling for that lens is the difference from being able to see to spending countless hours back at the eye doctor’s office and reordering another pair of scleral lenses. In some circumstances, a person won’t get a replacement unless they wait a few weeks.

At Turner Eye Institute, we’ve guided keratoconus patients to achieve their ideal vision through the latest procedures, including scleral lenses, intacs, and corneal crosslinking.

World Keratoconus Day — November 10th, 2018

Understanding how one person’s case of Keratoconus started and developed can help other people with Keratoconus find comfort and acceptance for their own condition. Keratoconus is a tough disease. Not only that it doesn’t play fair, but many people live months or years without realizing what’s happening to their vision.

Fortunately, Keratoconus isn’t a hopeless situation. Intacs and Crosslinking are able to stabilize the cornea and ensure healthier vision for longer, and, in many cases, permanently.

If you’re willing to share your own Keratoconus story, World Keratoconus Day is coming up. Keratoconusgroup.org is asking for people to place online submissions about their vision so that anyone who stumbles across their website can learn about Keratoconus and the effects it has on people each and every day.

https://www.keratoconusgroup.org/2018/10/world-keratoconus-day-2018.html